August News

It’s been a busy summer. I’m excited to have so many opportunities to edit and so many ideas for my writing, but sometimes I miss the days when summer meant slowing down.

Early in the summer, Alicia Stemper interviewed me for her Vitamin O blog, which highlights “the robust and wonderful people who make Orange County, North Carolina strong”! Her post is here: https://artsorange.org/vitamin-o-emily-buehler-bikes-bread-books/

Emily wearing eclipse glasses, sitting on a hay bale

Jessica and I watch the eclipse. Photo by Dane Summers.

I made my third trip to the Folk School for the eclipse, which was amazing. When totality came, we were sitting on the hay bales in the middle of the fields, with Venus overhead and the Davidson Hall barn swallows swooping about us. Read about it, here: https://blog.folkschool.org/2017/08/24/totality-brasstown-watching-eclipse-folk-school/

I’m teaching again in October (the class is full), with additional classes in January and June, 2018.

Then Conor O’Donovan interviewed me for the Modernist Breadcrumbs podcast, in anticipation of the arrival, this fall, of Modernist Bread. The series debuts on October 4 (not sure of my interview’s date yet), and you can hear the podcast here: http://heritageradionetwork.org/modernistbreadcrumbs/

I’m currently working on a series of sourdough-relayed bread articles for The Kitchn, also in anticipation of Modernist Bread. Amy Halloran and the Modernist Bread team will be doing posts as well. They’ll be posted in October.

Emily rides her bike while brandishing a baguette

Photo by Alicia Stemper

Writing about bread, and stumbling upon interesting new facts (like the different temperatures that bacteria and yeast thrive at, which can enable the baker to control the sourness of her sourdough), is making me want to delve back into bread research. Another game changer was finding out that through my William and Mary alumni association, I have online access to academic journals–I wouldn’t have to take the bus to UNC, where non-students are now limited to one hour of computer time. I might be able to revive Food Chem Blog! 

I’ve never had an interest in a second edition of Bread Science. I thought I had written everything I knew. I’m about to get more copies printed, and I had to open the Indesign file to make a few corrections (my email address and location). It was tempting to start copyediting the whole book–I didn’t even know about the Chicago Manual when I wrote it!–but each page that has changes adds additional cost to the printing. I shouldn’t start editing until I’m going to redo the whole book. And if I’m going to do that, I might think about adding new content. I wonder if there will be a second edition someday!

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